Flipping the Script: How Narrative Acts of Resistance during the Holocaust Can Teach Us To Tell Our Own True Stories

Date: June 15-19, 2020
Location: Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona

This five-day professional development seminar seeks to provide Holocaust and social justice-minded educators with opportunities to enrich their knowledge of Holocaust history and to consider how we can apply the lessons of the past to enact social justice in the present. Participants will explore how resistors and activists used stories as acts of resistance against false or misleading propaganda during the Holocaust and how teachers and students can use stories as acts of resistance against false or misleading narratives about themselves and their communities in media and popular society.

Educators will learn how to use Arizona’s primary source documents as a tool for researching and understanding the Holocaust, our state’s history, and the present moment — skills educators can take back to students in the classroom. Activities will include meeting with Holocaust survivors and scholars, a film screening, field trips, and attending a Shabbat service and dinner.

 

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Leaders

  • Tricia Parker

    Since 2002 Tricia has taught English in Phoenix. She currently teaches all levels of English language learners at Thunderbird High School. Tricia has been an active part of the Central Arizona Writing Project since 2012. She attended the Olga Lengyel Institute for Holocaust Studies (TOLI) Summer Seminar in 2015. Tricia is a committed Holocaust, genocide, and social justice educator. She writes, camps, gardens, and appreciates the deserts of the American Southwest.

  • Ashley Yap

    Ashley teaches English Language Arts at Chandler High School in Chandler, AZ, where she currently teaches 10th and 12th graders. She attended the TOLI NYC Summer Seminar in 2018. She is also proud to be a Teacher-Consultant with the Central Arizona Writing Project since 2013. Her professional interests include social justice literacies, culturally sustaining pedagogy, and youth participatory action research, amongst many, many others. In her non-working hours, she enjoys traveling, live music, podcasts, and hunting for her next food adventure.

Contact

For more information about The Olga Lengyel Institute for Holocaust Studies and Human Rights (TOLI), please contact info@tolinstitute.org

TOLI is located at 58 East 79th Street in Manhattan. (get directions)