Defying the “Single Story”: Resistance, Holocaust, and Human Rights in the Classroom

Date: July 12-18, 2020
Location: Charlotte, North Carolina

This seminar brings together teachers from across the Carolinas who are looking to deepen their practice of teaching the Holocaust and and human rights. Our overarching theme is resistance, and we investigate this idea in a number of ways. We will focus on acts of resistance through the lenses of Holocaust partisans and resisters, Native Peoples and Civil Rights activists. Our week features speaker presentations, field trips, and visits from scholars designed to allow educators to engage more deeply with these challenging topics. Participants will leave with new ways of thinking and teaching about the Holocaust, indigenous peoples, and human rights. The seminar is open to educators of all levels—from mid-elementary grades through college. There is no cost for the seminar, most meals are provided, and low-cost housing is available at Queens University of Charlotte.

 

Click here to apply!

Click here to download our flyer!

Have questions about this program? Email Donna Tarney dmtarney@yahoo.com


 

 

 

 

 

This project is made possible by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities or the North Carolina Humanities Council.

Leaders

  • Donna Tarney

    Donna Tarney is the Education Coordinator at The Stan Greenspon Center in Charlotte, North Carolina. She works with local school districts and individual schools to provide professional development for teachers and engaging in-school programs for students. ALl of her work centers on using lessons from the Holocaust to teach about human rights issues.  Prior to that, she taught at Charlotte Catholic High School for 14 years. During her time there she taught History, Government, and a Holocaust course. She also chaired CCHS’ Theology Department. Donna holds a master’s degree in Religious Education from Loyola University in New Orleans. She has participated in the Bearing Witness and Bearing Witness Advanced programs sponsored by the Anti-Defamation League, and the Jan Karski Institute for Holocaust Education Summer Institute. She presented a session on the Catholic Church and anti-Semitism at both the 2015 NCEA Conference in Tampa, Florida and the Bearing Witness Program in Washington, DC. Donna attended the TOLI New York City Summer Seminar in 2014.

  • Tonya Wertz-Orbaugh

    Tonya Wertz-Orbaugh has taught writing at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte (UNCC) since 2005, where she invites her students to inquire and write about the Holocaust. She holds a master’s in English from UNCC and has completed doctoral work in 19th Century British Literature at the University of South Carolina, where she won a teaching award. Tonya participated in TOLI’s New York City Summer Seminar in 2014. A teacher-consultant for the National Writing Project (NWP), she has presented on social justice issues and Holocaust writing genres at a National Writing Project conference at UNCC. Tonya is currently at work on a young adult novel about the Kindertransport. An essay about how she came to write about the Holocaust was published in the fall issue of the UNCC Writing Program Journal.

Contact

For more information about The Olga Lengyel Institute for Holocaust Studies and Human Rights (TOLI), please contact info@tolinstitute.org

TOLI is located at 58 East 79th Street in Manhattan. (get directions)